Kerry Book Adventure: Day 2

It was bound to happen. Today the vagaries of the Irish weather were felt with force. Yes, it rained. All day. We headed for Dingle which, unfortunately, has become even more touristy than I remembered – a pity but I suppose inevitable. We had two options – the Slea Head drive or the Connor Pass. Unluckily, we delayed our decision and set off just as the rain started. The higher we travelled the heavier the rain and by the time we reached the top of the Connor Pass, the cloud was blowing in at speed. Braving the elements, I managed to take a few snaps (forgive the raindrops blurring the pictures) just to prove to you that I was actually there! Kerry Book Adventure: Day 2

A Conversation with Author Barbara Lorna Hudson

This evening in the Library we have Barbara Lorna Hudson who has dropped in to say hello and to share some insights into her life as an author.

You are very welcome, Barbara, please introduce yourself:

Barbara-333-Edit-Print (2)I grew up on a farm in Cornwall, studied languages at Cambridge, became a social worker and have somehow ended up as an Oxford don. I have reinvented myself as a fiction writer in my 70s. A Conversation with Author Barbara Lorna Hudson

A Conversation with Author Miriam Drori

Today in the Library we have ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Miriam Drori, who has dropped in to say hello and to share some insights into her life as an author.

You are very welcome, Miriam, please introduce yourself:

Miriam DroriHello Pam and thank you for hosting me in the Library. I was born and brought up in London, UK and now live in Jerusalem, Israel. We have three grown-up children, two of whom still live at home. In the past, I worked with computers, first as a programmer and later as a technical writer. Now I write more interesting pieces. I also edit novels by other authors and have been lucky enough to have encountered some very talented authors through this work. My hobbies include folk dancing, walking, touring and of course reading. A Conversation with Author Miriam Drori

A Conversation with Author June Moonbridge

Today in the Library we have June Moonbridge, who has dropped in to say hello and to share some insights into her life as an author.

You are very welcome, June, please introduce yourself:

 J Moonbridge - newJune Moonbridge is my pen name. I come from Slovenia, a little country in the middle of Europe. So I apologise for all the grammar mistakes I’ll definitely make, as English is my second language.

I’m a full time working mother with two children and a husband. My biggest wish is to have a black cat (yes, my daughter still thinks I’m a witch!) and an Irish wolfhound, but I choose not to until I will have enough time for both. A Conversation with Author June Moonbridge

Celebrating Irish Women Authors: Katharine Tynan Hickson

This blog post is dedicated to Marcella & Keith Flanagan, Katharine’s relatives and my life-long friends

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It was a song I learnt in school and one, I’m sure, most of you know. All in the April Evening has a beautiful melody and the words touched something in my childish heart, something most of the songs that were inflicted on us at the time most certainly didn’t do. It was only many years later that I discovered that the writer of the poem that forms the lyrics of the song, was Katharine Tynan, and that she was related to my next door neighbour and life-long friend!

So who was she?

Katherine TynanKatharine was born in Clondalkin, Dublin, on 23rd January, 1859. She was one of twelve children and grow up on her father’s dairy farm. From age 6 to 14, she attended the Dominican Convent of St Catherine of Siena, Drogheda, and even considered life in a religious order. Celebrating Irish Women Authors: Katharine Tynan Hickson

A Conversation with Maggie Cammiss

This evening in the Library we have ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Maggie Cammiss, who has dropped in to say hello and to share some insights into her life as an author.

You are very welcome, Maggie, please introduce yourself:

Maggie Cammiss1It’s taken a while but I think I’ve arrived. This summer I put ‘novelist’ in the ‘profession’ column of my brand new marriage certificate. I worked in 24-hour rolling news for a long time which gave me a lot of inspiration for my writing. When I left I decided to jump straight in with a novel based on that environment. A Conversation with Maggie Cammiss

A Conversation with Patricia Hopper Patteson

I have a special guest in the Library today, fellow Dubliner, Patricia Hopper Patteson, who has dropped in to say hello and to share some insights into her life as an author.

You are very welcome, Patricia, please introduce yourself:

Patricia_pattesonHello, I’m Patricia Hopper Patteson. I’m a native of Dublin, Ireland, now living in West Virginia. For anyone who is not familiar with West Virginia, it’s south of New York and west of Washington, D.C. John Denver wrote the song “Country Roads” for West Virginia. I came here as a young bride and have lived in Morgantown, home to West Virginia University (WVU), ever since. I hold a B.A. and an M.A. from there. I’ve received numerous awards from the West Virginia Writers’ competition and my fiction and non-fiction have been published in magazines, reviews, and anthologies. When I’m not writing or working, I enjoy spending time with my two grown married children Brian and Tara and my grandson Jackson. A Conversation with Patricia Hopper Patteson

A Conversation with Author Francis H Powell

This evening in the Library we have ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Francis H Powell, who has dropped in to say hello and to share some insights into his life as an author.

You are very welcome, Francis, please introduce yourself:

Born in a commuter belt city called Reading, (England) like many a middle or upper for Pamclass child of such times, I was shunted off to an all-male boarding school aged eight, away from my parents for up to twelve weeks at a time, until I was 17. While at my first Art college, I met a writer called Rupert Thomson, who was in the process of writing his first book, Dreams of Leaving. His personality and wit resonated, although I have long lost contact with him. Later I lived in Austria, and in 1999 I moved to Paris.  During my time in Paris I met Alan Clark, who had a literary magazine called Rat Mort (dead rat). I began contributing and got hooked on writing short stories. My book, Flight of Destiny, is a result of this obsession.  I also write poetry. A Conversation with Author Francis H Powell

Easter 1916

Video still 1916
Demolition of 27 North Earl Street

“An elderly man stands utterly bewildered. Before him, his business and home are smouldering, black smoke billows from the skeletal remains and an acrid smell pervades the April air. Beside him, his wife and daughters stand, staring in horror. They have lost everything. All that remains of their home is a gable wall with fireplaces hanging grotesquely in mid-air. All is dust. Black and twisted remnants of their lives are the only signs that they had ever lived there. Too traumatised to even cry, they stand, silent and uncomprehending.” Easter 1916